Bedouin Ascent & Move D | Interference

8,70

What happens when two friends and fellow space-heads, high on TR-808s, analogue synths and 8-bit digital debris, rendezvous in the blistering heat of the Berlin summer in the midst of the heady love parade? Well, that’s the story that unfolds in this new release on binemusic…

SKU: BINE VYR21 Categories: ,

Description

What happens when two friends and fellow space-heads, high on TR-808s, analogue synths and 8-bit digital debris, rendezvous in the blistering heat of the Berlin summer in the midst of the heady love parade? Well, that’s the story that unfolds in this new release on binemusic…

Kingsuk Biswas, as Bedouin Ascent was a leading figure of the early UK Techno scene with releases on rising high, Ninja tune, Virgin, Island, etc. Bedouin Ascent’s music grew out of the post-punk/industrial sounds of the early 1980s, and eventually became part of England’s burgeoning club scene in the early 90s. His fusion of African, Indian, and Indonesian musical structures with experimental and electronic music had found a home in collaborations with Bill Laswell, BJ Cole, Coldcut, Jon Hassell, Zakir Hussain and many others.

In the summer of 1995 both Bedouin Ascent and the Source Records head honcho Move D (aka David Moufang) played live sets at the Interference festival, which took place in Berlin during the love parade. In the week that followed, and still buzzing from the creative caldron that was three days of Berlin techno, Kingsuk and David decided to continue the party and hang low at the communal km20 studio in Heidelberg.

The tracks bought together on this release feature many of the live jams and improvisations they immersed themselves in over those long summer nights almost 15 years ago. These sessions are represented here as they were laid down. no post production, overdubs or re-editing; you just get to hear the full interaction of the TR808, TR909, MS-20, Pro-One, Frontline X2, Yamaha TX802, etc… spontaneously as it was performed in 1995.

Beautifully ‘out of hand’ these runaway compositions breath gently without the urgency of a lot of newer computer music. Sometimes the sounds are barely contained by the filters and patch leads, and the instinctive touch of David and kingsuk find ways to pull it back and tame the circuits. The warm and sensual sound evokes the optimism of the era and the desire to take electronic music to new heights amid the ever encroaching commercialisation of mainstream Techno. It still sounds fresh and compelling today – probably especially interesting to those mapping the trajectories of Drum & Bass, Broken Beat, and Dubstep as they continue to scatter in their myriad forms.

The musical sensibility demonstrated in this release was as much a blueprint for the future as it was a celebration of the present.

Release Date // April 26, 2010
Format // Digital Album // Mini LP
Catalog Nr // BINE VYR21
EAN // 880319434617

4 reviews for Bedouin Ascent & Move D | Interference

  1. DE:BUG (DE)

    Historical material! After Interference Festival at the Love Parade Berlin in 1995, Move D took Kingsuk Biswas aka Bedouin Ascent with him and the both of them recorded these sessions at the Source Studio Heidelberg, which have now been released unaltered on Bine. Smooth bleeps, drum box magic and ideas which slowly emerge from the jams. Prototype electronica, still lightyears ahead of its time.

  2. Boomkat (UK)

    Originally recorded in 1995, these five tracks explore rhythmic mutations of jumpy-funked yet melodic electronics from two of the most endearing producers of that decade, Dave Moufang and Kingsuk Biswas aka Bedouin Ascen, layed down at the km20 studio in Heidelberg. Both artists’ signatures are stamped across the record, from the mutated Detroit electro and warm synth pads of ‘A1’ to the scuffed experimentalism and alien signals of ‘A2’ or the electro-techno classicism of ‘B1’, mixing ambient traits with traces of club-ready dance music, basically summed up as IDM. The remastering job from Berlin’s D&M gives the tracks the warmth and analog richness with which they would have been experienced back then and makes for a beautiful record for anyone intrigued by the jazzier and more abstracted side of Move D’s immense back catalog, or the home listening styles of Bedouin Ascent. Recommended!

  3. Vital Weekly (NL)

    A new work by Bedouin Ascent & Move D? Well, hardly. I have no idea what these guys are up to these days, but this ‘new’ record harks back to the good old days. Summer 1995 to be precise when they both played sets at Berlin’s Love Parade, at the Interference festival to be precise. Riding on energy (and who knows what else), they two fill the a week of jamming along using a TR808, TR909, Korg MS-20, a Pro-One, the Frontline X2 and more such wonders of analogue technology and set these machines to work. These jams are of course all recorded, on the spot and there is no overdubbing or post production afterwards. Nice, somewhat crude techno music at work here. Highly spontaneous stuff. I must admit I quite enjoyed this, simply because it reminded me of the days when listening to this kind of music – hardly dancing to it. I have no idea how dance music evolved from this to what it is now, so its hard to say how this kind of music is received now, but apparently Bine Music thinks there is life for this kind of archeological music. It would be nice to see an update by both artists and hear how now, fifteen years after the fact, a collaboration between Bedouin Ascent & Move D would sound like. This for now is just a fine teaser. (FdW)

  4. Decks Records (DE)

    ”Interfernce” contains the 14 years old sessions by Bedouin Ascent & Move D. The warm and sensual sound evokes the optimism of the era and the desire to take electronic music to new heights. It still sounds fresh and compelling today – especially interesting to those perhaps mapping the trajectories of Dubstep as they continue to scatter in their myriad forms. The musical sensibility demonstrated in this release was as much a blueprint for the future as it was a celebration of the present. Vinyl only – no CD, no digital!

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